Filter fail at O2

Ah well, just as i thought O2 had started to clean up their act as far as filtering, this episode, which, in a nutshell, illustrates just how difficult the addition of filters makes things.

Not – necessarily – because they get things wrong. But because the moment you start to filter, you need to put a whole support infrastructure around: and if you don’t get the latter right, chances are you are going to be making mistakes. Continue reading

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My Rex Harrison moment (with added porn filters)

Yes! Oh, yes! Oh, Yes!!! (Honest, we ARE talking “My Fair Lady” here, and not “When Harry met Sally”). But I do believe I’ve got it! By George, I’ve got it!

Finally, after putting the boot into the government again today on the abject muddy mess that is David Cameron’s input into the online porn debate, I can sort of see what they are on about: the outline of his great project. And once I’ve explained that, it will be time to unveil a project of my own. Continue reading

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Queer in Brighton: Life Stories, Histories and Differences (CFP)

Brighton & Sussex Sexualities Network Conference
18th September 2013, 10am-5.00pm

Co-Organisers: Brighton & Sussex Sexualities Network (BSSN), Queer in Brighton and Brighton Transformed

This conference seeks to work across activist/academic debates in order to develop understandings of LGBT and queer life stories, histories and differences in Brighton and beyond. It invites presentations, readings, workshops and other interventions that address questions such as:

– How is place important to queer politics and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans lives?
– What are queer life stories and queer his/her/hir-stories? How are these celebrated/contested?
– Who is left out of these stories?
– How can we tell our life stories and his/her/hir-stories?
– What does it mean to be/do/practice ‘queer’, ‘now’ and ‘then’?
– How do queer practices and understandings relate to embodied considerations,
such as those relating to health?
– What are the norms/canons of queer representation in Brighton and other Sussex heritage sites?
– Is a queer historiography needed to tell a queer history?
– What politics do these themes bring to the table?

These questions are deliberately broad in order to elicit a range of responses and you are invited to address the title of the conference in ways that exceed these inquiries. It is hoped that the questions spark discussions across sectors and artificial divides, including academic/activist, student/teacher, and other boundaries that can inhibit open dialogue and debate.

Please submit a proposal for contributions of around 200 words to BSSN@brighton.ac.uk by July 25th 2013.

Sessions will be organised to cross boundaries and sectors and presentation styles should be conscious of the varied audience.

As a conference that seeks to engage a range of communities the attendance fee is deliberately low, and all who attend will be charged. We have a limited number of volunteer roles, which will give individuals a free place at the conference.

Cost: £25 waged/£15 unwaged, concession. Cost includes coffee/tea and lunch.

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Call for Submissions for Transgender Studies Quarterly 2.1: Making Transgender Count

Transgender Studies Quarterly (TSQ)

This is a new journal, edited by Paisley Currah and Susan Stryker to be published by Duke University Press. TSQ aims to be the journal of record for the interdisciplinary field of transgender studies and to promote the widest possible range of perspectives on transgender phenomena broadly defined. Every issue of TSQ will be a specially themed issue that also contains regularly recurring features such as reviews, interviews, and opinion pieces. To learn more about the journal and see calls for papers for future special issues, visit http://lgbt.arizona.edu/tsq-main.

For information about subscriptions, visit

http://www.dukeupress.edu/Catalog/ViewProduct.php?productid=45648.


Call for Papers

As a relatively new social category, the very notion of a “transgender population” poses numerous intellectual, political, and technical challenges. Who gets to define what transgender is, or who is transgender? How are trans people counted-and by whom and for whom are they enumerated? Why is counting transgender members of a population seen as making that population’s government accountable to those individuals? What is at stake in “making transgender count”-and how might this process vary in different national, linguistic, or cultural contexts?

This issue of TSQ seeks to present a range of approaches to these challenges-everything from analyses that generate more effective and inclusive ways to measure and count gender identity and/or transgender persons, to critical perspectives on quantitative methodologies and the politics of what Ian Hacking has called “making up people.”

In many countries, large-scale national health surveys provide data that policy-makers rely on to monitor the health of the populations they oversee, and to make decisions about the allocation of resources to particular groups and regions-yet transgender people remain invisible in most of such data collection projects. The widespread deployment of gender as a binary category defined by the sex assigned at birth has made trans people invisible in government data collection.

Without the routine and standardized collection of information about transgender populations, some advocates contend, transgender people will not “count” when government agencies make decisions about the health, safety and public welfare of the population. But even as more agencies become more open to surveying transgender populations, experts and professionals are not yet of one mind as to what constitutes “best practices” for sampling methods that will accurately capture respondents’ gender identity/expression, and the diversity of transgender communities. In still other quarters, debates rage about the ethics of counting trans people in the first place.

TSQ invites proposals for scholarly essays that tackle transgender inclusion and/or gender identity/expression measurement and sampling methods in population studies, demography, epidemiology, and other social sciences. We also invite submissions that critically engage with the project of categorizing and counting “trans” populations.

Potential topics might include:

* best practices and strategies for transgender inclusion and sampling in quantitative research;

* critical reflections on past, current, and future data collection efforts;

* the potential effects of epidemiological research on health and other disparities in trans communities;

* who counts/gets counted and who does not: occlusions of disability, race, ethnicity, class, gender in quantitative research on trans communities;

* the tension between the contextually specific meaning of transgender identities and the generality and fixity that data collection requires of its constructs and social categories; *implications of linguistic, geographical, and cultural diversity in definitions of transgender and the limits of its applicability;

* critical engagements with of the biopolitics of enumerating the population.

Guest editors

The guest editors for this issue are Jody Herman (Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law), Emilia Lombardi (Baldwin Wallace University), Sari L. Reisner (Harvard School of Public Health), Ben Singer (Vanderbilt University), and Hale Thompson (University of Illinois at Chicago). Any questions should be sent to the guest editors at tsqjournal@gmail.com.


Deadline

Please send full length article submissions by December 31, 2013 to tsqjournal@gmail.com along with a brief bio including name, postal address, and any institutional affiliation. Illustrations, figures and tables should be included with the submission.

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Where are all the gay love songs?

OK: we all know there are songs out there that ARE gay, “really”. Works by k d lang and the Scissor Sisters spring to mind. But there is so much more that isn’t: that probably IS gay, because of who wrote it; or maybe was never meant to be taken as such, but has been taken up by the LGBT community because it says something that truly strikes a chord. “Defying Gravity”, regularly performed at Pride events, is one such.

That’s why Peterborough-based singer songwriter Jules Morgan is releasing two tracks this month in time for Valentine’s day. The first, “A love song” was released this weekend, and is unashamedly dedicated to Jo, with whom she has been together for nine years in total and civil spouse for four. The second – Lynton Road – is the first song she ever wrote, in 2005, and is due to be released officially for the first time on 14 February, throughout the course of Valentine’s Day.

Jules explained: “The official release date is 14 February. But the song is actually going to be released about a dozen times during the day, on local sites, as the dateline switches over from Wednesday night to Thursday morning.”

In doing this, Jules hopes that she will succeed in turning what is an essentially musical event into a political statement. She says: “I still remember what it was like coming out. Its never easy and for many young people, whether lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender, it can be the loneliest time of their lives – made even more so by the fact that when they look around, nobody seems to be singing about what they are feeling.

“That’s why this is important. I’m not going to pretend that I’m up there with the superstars – but this is from the heart, in every sense of the word: and I hope that in some way, putting these songs out there will make a difference to someone.”

Jules plays her own works at open mike and local events in the East Midlands. She has previously played at Peterborough City Roots and battle of the bands for Peterborough, as well as live in London. She is hoping now to play a lot more, especially at festivals organised by and for the LGBT community.

Later in the year, she will be releasing a further song – “Out” – which focuses on coming out and the problems that gay people face in terms of being ostracised by their families.

The first of the songs above can be listened to now.

Jules may be contacted directly through julesmorgan21@hotmail.com

Oh…and here’s a tiny snippet of lyric from her first song:

…thank God for the Bill
That enabled us to
Enjoy the view
That a man and a woman
Take for granted these things
From this woman to this woman
It means everything

Contemporary? Or wot?

janexx

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News release: ProtestTransphobia demonstrate outside offices of Daily Telegraph

The following release was circulated on behalf of Protest Transphobia, who are today demonstrating outside the offices of the Telegraph newspaper, to protest that paper’s decision to republish an article by Julie Burchill, originally published in the Observer, and later withdrawn in response to widespread concerns that the language used was abusive towards the transgender community and possibly even amounted to “hate speech”.

For further information,please contact the organisers of the demo – Protest Transphobia – directly via protest_transphobia@hotmail.co.uk

A pdf version is also available here.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Protest against media attacks on the UK’s trans community moves to the Telegraph: demonstration scheduled for 26 January

Following a successful demonstration outside the offices of the Guardian newspaper on 17 January, Protest Transphobia will be holding a rally outside the offices of the Telegraph newspaper between 13.00 and 15.00 on Saturday 26 January.

Their protest marks outrage at the Telegraph’s decision to republish an article by Julie Burchill, previously withdrawn by the Observer, that attacked the transgender community in language widely regarded as abusive.

Representatives from the group will be seeking to meet with senior members of the Telegraph’s editorial staff to hand over an open letter detailing the hurt felt by the UK’s transgender community at the Telegraph’s action and to discuss the contents of that letter with them.

Accusing the Telegraph of skewing the way in which this debate has been positioned, they write:

“By framing this debate in terms of free speech and the right to offend, we believe that the Telegraph has glossed over the reasons for the anger felt towards Julie Burchill’s article and has been complicit in attempts to erase public understanding of the real life impact of transphobia upon trans people living in our society.

“If your interest is in free speech we would ask why you have not commissioned a piece from a trans commentator for your publication.”

The letter includes suggestions for ways in which the Telegraph can go some way to undoing the harm done, including a meet with representatives of the trans community to discuss the issues raised and the commission a piece from a trans journalist to balance Ms Burchill’s piece.

Trans activist, Kai Weston added: “A poll in the Independent showed 90% of respondents felt the Burchill piece went too far.

“A recent study found that trans people’s mental health appears to be significantly worsened by the transphobia they encounter, with 84% having considered suicide.

“Despite this, while defending its republication of the Burchill piece in terms of “free speech”, the Telegraph has completely failed to balance the debate with any trans voices: the Telegraph is, in fact, no different to the tabloid press in its determination to erase real trans people and their experiences from any objective reporting in the UK.”

In a previous demonstration organised by Protest Transphobia at the offices of Guardian Media Group an open letter with 290 signatures was accepted by members of that paper’s senior editorial team.

Since the demonstration, The Observer has published a full apology for publishing the Julie Burchill’s article.

Her piece is also being looked at by the Press Complaints Commission, which has taken the unusual step of investigating whether the language used by its author was discriminatory or whether it constituted “hate speech”, even though it was not directed at any specific individual, as would normally be required before an investigation could take place.

In a statement issued on 22 January, the National Union of Journalists Equality Council further condemned this piece for containing “unnecessarily provocative, gratuitously offensive and bigoted material”.

For further information, contact protest_transphobia@hotmail.co.uk

Additional information

1. The demonstration is planned to take place at the offices of the Telegraph Media Group at 111 Buckingham Palace Road, London, SW1W 0DT between 13.00 and 15.00 on Saturday 26 January, 2013.

2. The main website for the Protest Transphobia campaign can be found at http://www.protest-transphobia.org/

3. The NUJ statement on this event can be found at http://www.nuj.org.uk/innerPagenuj.html?docid=2774

4. Information on abuse suffered and harm to trans people can be found at:

http://www.scottishtrans.org/Article.aspx?id=98


Appendix I: text of letter to be handed to Telegraph editors

To the editor:

We are writing in support of Protest Transphobia’s demonstration being held outside The Telegraph’s offices in London on 26/01/2013.

As allies and members of the trans community, we believe that the decision to republish the article “Transsexuals need to cut it out” by Julie Burchill was unfortunate and misguided. In particular the way the debate has been framed is unhelpful.

By framing this debate in terms of free speech and the right to offend, we believe that the Telegraph has glossed over the reasons for the anger felt towards Julie Burchill’s article and has been complicit in attempts to erase public understanding of the real life impact of transphobia upon trans people living in our society.

If your interest is in free speech we would ask why you have not commissioned a piece from a trans commentator for your publication.

In deciding what is, and is not newsworthy the press acts as a gatekeeper of public debate. As such it has a responsibility to ensure that all sides are heard, not just those it agrees with. It also has a responsibility to ensure public safety.

We believe that all trans people, as part of the public, should be able to live without fear of violence, harassment, or unequal treatment on the basis of their trans status, and that Julie Burchill’s article could be seen as an incitement of hatred against trans people, and in particular, towards trans women.

A study by Trans Media Watch entitled “How Transgender People Experience the Media” in 2010 looked at these issues and two things stand out:

- In total, 21.5% of respondents had experienced verbal abuse that they believed was associated
with representations of transgender people in the media on at least one occasion.

- 8% reported that they had received physical abuse that they believed was connected to an item or items in the media.

We would therefore ask that you:

- Meet with representatives of our community to discuss these issues.

- Commission a piece from a trans journalist to balance Ms Burchill’s piece.

- Review Julie Burchill’s article in the light of the editor’s code and publish the results of that review.

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Tread lightly…tread very lightly indeed…

There is always place for legitimate protest. Some individuals, by virtue of their status, their privilege might even be legitimate targets for such protest. David Cameron, for instance. Or the Pope.

For both are surrounded, as standard, by their own personal phalanges of bodyguards. The Observer, too, as inanimate object feels a fair target.

Suzanne Moore, no matter your views on her “papabilità”, is not. Continue reading

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And (not) in other news today

You will, of course have read in today’s papers all about the killing of Brazilian trans performer, Cecilia Marahouse. Not.

For despite a number of bloggers reporting the story yesterday, the national press appeared strangely indifferent to the story. Which is odd, given just how prominently the topic of Brazilian transsexual murder has been in those same papers over the last ten days or so. You’d think, on topicality grounds alone – the way dangerous dogs are mostly not news, until a particularly gruesome story hits the headlines and then suddenly loads of identikit stories creep out of the woodwork – it would be newsworthy. Continue reading

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Brazilian transsexual murdered

With thanks to Lexie Cannes for putting me on to this one:

On the evening of Friday, January 11, around the time Suzanne Moore was flouncing off twitter, Cecilia Marahouse a trans performer well known in gay clubs in Ceará, Northeastern Brazil, was murdered with 6 shots near the Av José Bastos in the state capital, Fortaleza.

The state’s LGBT population were reportedly shocked by the news, with friends and fans of Cecilia going on to Facebook to pay homage and seek justice.

However, as the website that reported this incident commented: “That may never come, because as we know to the authorities unfortunately a gay, lesbian or transvestite murder is just another statistic!”

That is all.

jane

NOTE: the above report is based on direct translation of lgbt blogs from Brazil. I don’t have the resource to double-check this from here – so anyone who wishes to is welcome to follow through.

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Open letter to Tom Peck at the Indie

Hi Tom,

Thought i’d drop you a line because i felt slightly bad about coming down so hard on you in respect of your piece, yesterday, on the Moore-Burchill saga. I know i used the h-word, and that is probably unfair. Though i do think this entire debate is uncovering a very large hypocrisy at the centre of press thinking and if you’d like to understand better how this issue relates directly to Leveson, please read: http://sexualitymatters.wordpress.com/2013/01/15/the-hypocrisy-that-pervades-press-freedom/ Continue reading

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